Was Sleeping Beauty meditating during her nude scenes?

Sleeping Beauty actress Emily Browning has told CBS News Entertainment that she dealt with possible discomfort while filming nude scenes for that film via the practice of meditation. Her words:

“I taught myself to meditate in those scenes. I wasn’t present in those scenes at all, so they didn’t really have as much effect on me.”

Here’s that story.

That’s cool that she found a way to deal, but does that sound like meditation to you? She may not have been sleeping, but she doesn’t seem to have really been awake, either.

5 Comments »

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    Rob rGyatso Says:
    May 12th, 2011 at 1:35 pm
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    Hi, @rgyatso here.

    This sounds like the avoidance-withdrawal that is noted with people and especially children when they are faced with persistent and unavoidable trauma and abuse.

    They cannot do anything about it, they can’t control it, they can’t run away, so they cope by “checking out.” This strategy also seems to be connected to the creation of “multiples” as a survival mechanism for abuse victims.

    So, probably not meditation. I would think that therapy would be a good idea in her near future. And the swift insertion of a heavy boot up the backside of her agent. Oh, excuse me, a *Compassionate and *Skillful heavy boot up the ba ……

    Blessings

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    Great, great comment, rgyatso. Thanks.

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    d.sullivan Says:
    May 14th, 2011 at 11:24 pm
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    Not all forms of Buddhist meditation involve a state of being present of everything we are feeling. There are many types of meditation within all Buddhist traditions, many of which can be used to gain “seclusion” from negative mental states, as opposed to facing them head on as in mindfulness meditation. Both have their appropriate time and place within Buddhist practice.

    It is not uncommon these days for meditation on the breath to be assigned to people suffering from intense anxiety as a way of calming the feelings of agitation. This is not focusing on the feelings of anxiety, since the breath is the primary object, but nor should we hyperbolically label it as “avoidance-withdrawal”. In many cases it is merely skillful means.

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    d.sullivan Says:
    May 14th, 2011 at 11:43 pm
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    “They cannot do anything about it, they can’t control it, they can’t run away, so they cope by “checking out.” This strategy also seems to be connected to the creation of “multiples” as a survival mechanism for abuse victims.”

    None of which applies to the actress in question, so I fail to see your point. The phenomena of a personality breaking into “multiples” has almost always been in connection to the experience of intense sexual abuse, and never something as mild as simply posing nude. The actress was not a victim, not facing “unavoidable trauma.”

    Before we begin diagnosing the young lady, recommending any mode of treatment, and much less passing judgment on her agent, let us remind ourselves that we only have a sentences worth of information to draw upon and in that light refrain from playing psychotherapist.

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    Rick Vosper Says:
    June 2nd, 2011 at 5:35 am
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    The presence/absence of awareness in is a big deal among athletes dealing with pain in physical exertion, too.

    Consensus among sports psychologists is that while most amateurs try to distance themselves from the unpleasant experience via distraction, star athletes almost universally work to become present in the unpleasant moment. This is a very common observation among endurance athletes like marathoners, cyclists, and cross-country skiers.

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